Richardson Mask Mold

showing the mold bending

I've deprecated this project.  Look at this project for a much better(exponential) manufacturing:
https://3dprint.nih.gov/builds/saintmeh/nestable-mold-unaltered-montana-...

Printable plugs and masters for creating molds to make masks.  Make sure to fully cure, air, and dry your masks.  We don't need HCWs breathing in fumes from parts that are still curing!  That hasn't been a problem yet... let's not make it a problem.  Casted parts are much less likely than 3D extruded parts to allow the corona virus through.  However, casted parts have their own dangers when worn on the face.  Be safe. Be patient. Be smart.

The idea is that we make masters that make molds.  We give the masters to hackerspaces/makerspaces which then create more masters and molds.  Each makerspace marks their manufacture, mold number, and model number  "13379."   The molds are distributed to membership and the public.  The public creates and returns the masks to the makerspace for QC.  The makerspace then donates the masks to the local hospitals with propery documentation and warnings after inspecting each one for defects and fumes.

You can get documentation and warnings at https://www.makethemasks.com/  But I suggest you add the addional warning similar to "Wait to use this mask if it smells like curing plastic.  If you get a headache from this mask, remove and replace it immediately."

This solves distribution and creates an exponential growth curve in manufacturing.  Again, I stress QC of fumes with this.  The mask wont smell any worse than smelling the top of a car once it fully cures and airs... but you must let it cure and air.

I'm currently testing out a new technique to cast multiple masks at a time. I would like someone to try resins other than polyester(and obviously get feedback with small productions).  Polyester is fast, cheap, clear(to see defects), strong, and of acceptable viscosity.  There may be better resins.

 

EDIT:

Use the following mold making materials to create a very safe version of this cast!  Thanks Smooth On! :)

  • Ecoflex 00-35 to create molds
  • TASK 8 to cast masks (to allow the mask to be cleaned in an autoclave!)
  • Smooth-cast Semi-rigit 61D Casting resin to cast masks that wont handle an autoclave (some flexibility for an improved face seal, but still very rigid for the filtration insert)

 

Printer Technology/Material 
Printer Make/Model 

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showing the mold bending
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Comments

What material are you using to pour the masks in the molds? I'm looking for a resin like material that you can still heat form the mask to ensure a proper fit.

EDIT:  I HAVE FOUND BETTER RESINS:  USE SMOOTH CAST 61D FROM SMOOTH ON.  ADD A SKIN SAFE SILICONE GASKET FOR GOOD MEASURE.
I'm going to stick with polyester resin(fiberglass resin) because it's clear(so you can see cracks if they start to appear), it's cheap, It's rigid enough to snap the mask filter in place(though I completely understand why you want it to be flexible), and it's fast setting.  You can thin with <2% styrene (I avoid using acetone to keep the mask strong).   Instead of heat forming every mask to faces, use foam trim  around just the top half and replace the foam trim(and filter) when you sanitize the mask.  I've got a much better mold that I'm testing out.  It will produce many masks at a time if it works.

If you find a better resin, let me know.  I've explored fiberglast's epoxy(pricey), HDPE(too solid), and polyester resin.  These plugs are just to make the silicone molds. 
 

I had to cast silicone molds using the "master" files first.

Use the following mold making materials to create a very safe version of this cast!  Thanks Smooth On! :)

  • Ecoflex 00-35 to create molds
  • TASK 8 to cast masks (to allow the mask to be cleaned in an autoclave!)
  • Smooth-cast Semi-rigit 61D Casting resin to cast masks that wont handle an autoclave (some flexibility for an improved face seal, but still very rigid for the filtration insert)